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A Brief Assessment On The Paris Climate Agreement And Compliance Issue

Since the Paris Agreement is expected to apply after 2020, the first formal inventory of the agreement will not be carried out until 2023. However, as part of a decision attached to the agreement, the parties decided to restart the five-year cycle with a “facilitation dialogue” on collective progress in 2018 and the presentation of the NDC by 2030 to 2020. The major challenge in the development of an American NDC will be to reconcile the need and desire for greater ambition with the need to present a credible and sustainable NDC over time. The Biden campaign`s climate strategy aims for net zero emissions by 2050, but it would be counterproductive to present an NDC that the United States cannot reasonably achieve. It is therefore important that the U.S. NDC is firmly anchored in national climate policy. However, it will be some time before a new Biden administration conducts consultations (with Congress, national stakeholders and the international community) and develops and develops strategies to support an ambitious and sustainable NDC. Many countries have stated in their INDCs that they intend to use some form of international emissions trading scheme to implement their contributions. In order to ensure the environmental integrity of these transactions, the agreement requires the parties to respect accounting practices and to avoid double counting of “mitigation results transferred internationally.” In addition, the agreement will create a new mechanism that would help contain and support sustainable development and could produce or certify negotiable emission units according to its design. The Paris Agreement provides for a number of binding procedural obligations.

The parties are committed to preparing, communicating and maintaining successive NDCs; “domestic mitigation measures” to achieve their NDCs; report regularly on their emissions and on progress in implementing their NDCs. The agreement also provides that the successive NDCs of each party “will represent a progression” beyond their previous one and “reflect its highest possible ambitions.” Obtaining their NDC by a party is not a legally binding obligation. Adaptation – the measures to be taken to deal with the effects of climate change – is much more important under the Paris Agreement than it has done so far under the UNFCCC. As well as the parties will make contributions to the reduction, the Agreement requires all parties to plan and implement adjustment efforts “where appropriate” and encourages all parties to report on their adjustment efforts and/or needs. The agreement also provides for a review of progress in adaptation and the adequacy and effectiveness of adjustment support in the overall inventory that will be completed every five years. In 2013, at COP 19 in Warsaw, the parties were invited to make their “nationally planned contributions” (INDC) to the Paris Agreement in due course prior to COP 21. These bids represent the mitigation targets set by each country for the period from 2020.